In the Land of Tsukemen.

The Land of Tsukemen.
Nothing beats a bowl of Tsukemen.

There are a thousand and one articles on the internet reiterating the benefits of travelling. I don’t see a reason to encourage people to travel, unless they are on the related industry’s payroll. When our ancestors settled down and took up agriculture, their thirst to explore, so as to understand, only grew stronger. We have never left our nomadic tendencies behind. It is still in our nature to explore the worlds beyond our own.

Silly talk aside, after a year of freshman toil and a summer internship, I decided that I needed a break to simply relax. I had conceived a solo trip but it turned out to be a father-and-son trip, which I didn’t mind. Except that there were fewer bits of relaxing, and more of trying to be a better son. Leading a trip can be more tiring than wandering off on your own. In any case, nothing beats family and my dad’s pretty cool. Thanks Dad.

Japan never disappoints. It isn’t a perfect country, nor can it sway my attachment to Paris, but its wonders are boundless. It tops my list of most-visited countries, yet there remains so much more uncovered treasures, waiting to be discovered on my next visit. And Japan is so much more than Tokyo. Admittedly, for Tokyo, I’ve gotten used to marvelling at its amazing produce, unparalleled hospitality, and endless food basements. On this trip, I sought out a few special places, which have impressed upon me subtly, yet indelibly. By chance, these places line up in their respective categories: Coffee, Tsukemen, Pastry, and Sushi. I will write about these highlights individually, in time to come, otherwise this would make a very long post. In short, dedication is key to excellence, and the Japanese know it best.

Who can walk away from fireworks?
Who can walk away from fireworks?

Moving on from all things edible, this trip also coincided with the Sumidagawa fireworks festival, which also happens to be on my dad’s birthday. I don’t like crowds, but I couldn’t walk away from my first Japanese festival. Everyone had put on their yukata-s, brought bentos for their picnics along Sumida River. Night came and so Tokyo celebrated my dad’s birthday, with lights and sparkles incomparable to the little candle on my dad’s cake, which we had later in the night. Surely the crowd was nearly unbearable, but it is difficult to regret attending such a festival.

No regrets too, to have stayed in Tokyo for six days. It was slightly longer than necessary, but not having to rush from city to city was a blessing. Perhaps it would take a few years before I return to this city, but there is no doubt that I would visit again. Till then!